Stati of Projects

I’ve been jumping around from one project to another on an as-needed basis, and here is the current status of each.

RIEL – I’ve been updating the colorizing code, adding the functionality to use extended color codes on ANSI terminals, instead of the default 10.

Glark – In the midst of a major rewrite, for both code purity and functionality. The main changes so far are extensions to the path/file arguments, bringing in some functionality from find. Glark will also (with the imminent integration of RIEL) support extended colors.

PVN – This project was in heavy development until a month ago, when it went into a state of waiting for updates to Glark, since it will be using Glark for its seek (searching) subcommand.

DiffJ – This project I rewrote in JRuby, but that was a little too slow for a command-line application –  even heavily tweaked, I couldn’t get the startup time under two seconds. So I re-rewrote it in Java, and intend to revisit it to add more intelligent code comparisons, such as understanding that “if (a == b) foo();” is the same as “if (a == b) { foo(); }”

IJDK – Mostly dormant at this point. When I’ve rewritten Java projects, I’ve tried to extract the generic code from them and add them to IJDK, but I haven’t been heavily involved with any of my Java projects lately.

Java-Diff – A while ago this was brought up to date to use generics, and was refactored for code clarity. There hasn’t been any reason to update it since then.

DoctorJ – Alas, this is dormant. Some of its warnings have been integrated into the Java compiler, such as mismatched parameter names. It still goes beyond that level of pedanticalness, so it is most suitable in the development of projects where documentation is paramount, such as APIs.

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Projects Now on GitHub

I am in the process of migrating some of my projects to my space at GitHub.

At this point, the following exist:

  • DiffJ – a Java-aware command-line utility for comparing Java files. This program ignores whitespace and comments, and detects added and removed classes, methods, and fields, as well as changes in code.
  • IJDK – extensions to the JDK, primarily motivated by functionality in various Groovy and Ruby libraries.